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Haiti

 


History
   The Aviation Corps of the Haitian Guarde was first formed in 1943. The first insignia was a disc horizontally divided, blue over red, with a white border, usually, but not always, with side bars following U.S. usage. In 1964 a return was made to the pre-1806 national colours of red and black. This was reflected in a change to the insignia. In 1971 the blue was reinstated and the military insignia took the form of a blue and red roundel with white side bars.
Haiti 1943 1971

 

  

Honduras

Honduras 


History
   Military aviation in Honduras dates from 1921 when the first of a succession of mercenary pilots and their aircraft were employed by the government. Aircraft were painted overall in the national colours of blue and white. This was usually combined with a blue, white and blue rudder, and the national arms on the fuselage. The Honduran Air Force was officially formed on 25 February 1936. With the advent of American aid during the Second World War, a specific national insignia was formulated. This was a blue, white and blue rudder and wingtips, the white area containing a single blue five-pointed star. With the advent of jet aircraft in the 1970s national insignia was relegated to a small national flag on the fin.
Honduras 1936 1975

 

  

Hong Kong

 


History
   The original Hong Kong Volunteer Air Force was formed in the 1930s and saw action, but not combat, against the Japanese in 1941. The defence force, with an air arm, was re-formed in 1946 and became the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Air Force in 1970. Until this time standard RAF, roundels were used. By the 1980s several aircraft were marked with red wing tips and rudders, a red fuselage band edged in white and blue, and the Hong Kong coat of arms on the fin. Although returned to Chinese control in 1997 Hong Kong has the status of a Special Administrative Region. Government aircraft bear a red and white roundel, which includes the five-petal lotus flower and inscriptions in Chinese - Government Flying Service of Hong Kong SAR, and Hong Kong in English. The aircraft carry Chinese civil registrations.
Hong Kong 1982 1997

 

  

Hungary

Hungary 


History
   During the First World War, Hungarian aircraft were marked as those of Austria, Some naval aircraft, however, unofficially carried the shield of Hungary as well as that of Austria on the fin marking. 
   After the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in November 1918, the Hungarian Republic was set up, but it was riven by internal factions. The communists finally appeared as the strongest group and a Hungarian Soviet Republic was established, in April 1919. This was immediately invaded by Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and Romania. To defend the new republic a Red Air Corps was organised with a large collection of First World War aircraft and veteran aviators. This air corps used the Soviet red star as a marking, usually on a white panel, on wings and fuselage. A white star on a red panel was occasionally used on the lower wings, The traditional Hungarian colours of red, white and green, dating back to the fifteenth century, were painted in chevron fashion across the top wings of some aircraft from 24 March 1919. 
   On the collapse of the Soviet Republic in August 1919, the air corps was disbanded and military activity was forbidden in Hungary, A clandestine air force was set up in the late 1920s marked with civil registrations but often, in addition, various forms of national colours. The air force was officially born on 23 August 1938, and became the Royal Hungarian Air Force on 1 January 1939. Aircraft were marked with a chevron design in red, white and green across the wings and fin. 
   With the participation of Hungary in the Russian campaign of 1941, the air force's national insignia was brought into line with the other Axis countries by using a cross-type marking, This was introduced in March 1942 and consisted of a black square bearing a cross In white, and later various shades of grey, Initially fins and elevators were striped in the national colours. On 14 April 1948 a new air force was formed with a new marking, a green spot on a white triangle on a larger red disc. After the communist takeover this was replaced, on 15 November 1949, with a red star inside two thin rings of red and green. On 16 June 1951 Hungary joined Romania and Bulgaria by adopting a marking consisting of a small roundel in national colours superimposed in the centre of a red star. This was used until the communist collapse of 1990. On 31 January 1991, a return to the chevron marking, similar to that in use between 1938 and 1942, was made. During the October 1956 uprising, a Hungarian flag was painted over the red stars on some rebel aircraft.
Hungary 1919Hungary 1919Hungary 1938 1941Hungary 1942 1945Hungary 1944 1945Hungary 1948 1949Hungary 1949 1951Hungary 1951 1991Hungary 1991Hungary Insurgants 1956