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Laos  
Laos  


History
   Founded as the Laotian Army Aviation Service in 1955, this force became known as the Royal Lao Air Force in 1960. After a long period of civil war the monarchy relinquished control to the Pathet Lao rebels and the country became the Lao People's Democratic Republic. Between 1955 and the fall of the monarchy in 1975, military aircraft were marked with the national flag as a fin flash and a roundel version as a wing and fuselage marking. Upon a red background were three white elephants under a parasol, representing the monarchy, standing on five steps, representing the five First Commandments of Buddhism. 
   Since the early 1980s, all aircraft have been marked with the new Laotian flag of red over blue over red. A white disc is superimposed on the blue.

 

  

Latvia  
Latvia  


History
   This Baltic republic was independent from 1918 until 1940, and again from 1991. Although initially Latvian aircraft were marked on wingtips and rudder with the national colours of red, white and red, between 1918 and 1940 they bore a red swastika turned on its point. This was marked, usually on a white disc, on fuselage sides and below the wings. The marking was often omitted on the top wings, or shown without the white disc. On later aircraft it carried the white disc marking above the wings. The paramilitary National Guard, during the late 1930s, marked their aircraft with a red indented cross on a white disc on fuselage sides and below the wings. Only Latvian naval aircraft of this period carried any fin or rudder markings. This was a black rope and anchor design. A Latvian unit attached to the German Air Force saw service on the Eastern Front during the Second World War. These aircraft carried a black cross on the wings and fuselage, and a reversed swastika on the fin. 
   The new Latvian Air Force of 1992 bore the national flag, the same as that of the inter-war period, as a fin flash and in roundel form on wings and fuselage. This was reddish-brown divided with a thin white stripe. From 1994 the Latvian Army Reserve marked its aircraft with a red outline cross on wings and fin.

 

 

Lebanon  
Lebanon  


History
   Lebanon secured its independence after being a French mandate in 1943, and formed an air force in 1949, Its aircraft have always carried the same markings: These are the national flag as a fin flash that is red over white over red, with a green cedar tree on the white. The fuselage and wing roundel is in the same colours but consists of a red disc on which is a white triangle with a green central spot. On some aircraft of the early 1950s the flag was marked as rudder striping and a small version of the roundel was painted on the fin.

 

 

Lesotho  
Lesotho  


History
   Lesotho, formerly Basutoland, is a landlocked country surrounded by South Africa. The air squadron of the Lesotho Defence Force marked its aircraft with the national flag. A roundel in the flag's colours of blue, white, red and green was used.  A new national flag was adopted in 1986 and the air force roundel used the new national colours of green, white and blue.

 

 

Liberia  
  More information to follow


History
The Air Reconnaissance Unit of the Liberian Army was founded in 1976 and bore the national flag on the fin. From 1986 the unit bore insignia on wings and fuselage very similar to that of the USA, but with a much smaller white star. Currently only the national flag is used.

 

  

Libya  
Libya 2012
 


 

History
   The Royal Libyan Air Force was formed in 1959 and carried the national flag as a fin flash, with a roundel version on the wings and fuselage. The flag, red over black over green, carried a white star and crescent on the black. The star and crescent did not appear on the roundel, which was in the three colours and with a wider black ring. 
   In 1969 the monarchy was overthrown and the Libyan Republic Air Force changed to a roundel and fin marking in red, white and block, exactly the some as Egypt. The two countries were forging very close ties at this time. During the mid-1970s, the Libyan flag, and therefore the fin flash, also bore the golden falcon of the Quraysh tribe. 1978 saw political conflict, with Egypt and Libya leaving the Federation of Arab Republics. A new flag in plain green to denote complete devotion to Islam was adopted, and this was reflected in the plain green roundel and fin flash marked on aircraft.

In March/April 2011 a number of aircraft including Mig 23s amd Mil-24s defected to the Free Libya forces. The roundels were changed to a version of the Benghazi flag. That is a roundel split horizontally red over black over green with a white star and crescent on the black. The flag is used as a fin flash. This is now the official insignia of the Libyan Air Force


 

 

  

Lithuana  
Lithuana  


History
   This southernmost of the Baltic republics gained its independence in 1919. The national colours of yellow, green and red were marked on the rudder, fuselage and wings in a diamond pattern, usually on a white background. The central, red area was later marked with a representation of a mounted St George in white. In 1920 aircraft began to be marked with an ancient Lithuanian symbol, the white double cross of Vytis. At first this appeared on a red shield, but by 1921 it was normally used plain, but with a black border on pale surfaces. 
   The Lithuanian National Guard was formed in the 1938. Aircraft were marked with the double cross insignia under the wings and on the rudder in white on a red shield. 
   Lithuania became part of the Soviet Union in 1940, but regained its independence in 1991. A return was then made to the 1921-40 double Vytis cross marking, outlined in black where necessary. Both police and National Guard carry their own insignia on fuselage side and occasionally on the wings with a cross marking on the rudder.
Central Lithuania 
   In October and November 1920, Polish forces set up a puppet state called Central, or Srodkowan, Lithuania. Aircraft, actually of the Polish Air Force, carried special markings. These were unusual in that they differed on the port and starboard wings. On the port wing a red square with a white border was carried, on the starboard the colours were reversed. No fuselage markings were used and the rudder was split vertically red and white with red leading, the reverse of the then current Polish practice.

 

 

Luxembourg  
Luxembourg  


History
   In the late 1950s the Luxemburg defence force acquired a small number of light aircraft. Although civil registered they carried roundels of blue and white with a red lion on the central white. A fin flash of either the national flag or a design of red, white and blue diagonal stripes was used. The Luxembourg defence forces no longer possess an aviation complement, but for political reasons NATO aircraft are registered in the Grand Duchy. The NATO symbol, a four-pointed compass design in blue, appears in normal positions on wings, fuselage and fin. Since the mid-1980s aircraft have also carried a roundel based on the national arms of Luxembourg. This is a red lion on a blue and white striped disc.